David Westerfield

Theology, Culture, Technology, Reviews, and Other Commentary



Redirecting Only The Root URL Within NGINX

For some reason I found this rule to be difficult but finally got it to work thanks to the internets. This is the only rule that worked within the NGINX configuration to get only the root URL to redirect to (in my case) a non-SSL location. Here’s the section:

server {
  (..)
  location / {
    rewrite ^(/)$ http://www.domain.com/ permanent;
  }
}

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9336261/nginx-rewrite-only-when-root-domain

Optimal NGINX SSL Settings

Recently I embarked on finding the optimal NGINX SSL security settings and stumbled across this post: https://raymii.org/s/tutorials/Strong_SSL_Security_On_nginx.html

For a number of reasons, it recommends disabling SSLv3 (as a result of its insecurity), settings AES256 as the standard cipher to utilize and a couple of other things that can prevent attacks. Good stuff to tighten up security on an NGINX SSL implementation.

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Rick Warren’s Chameleon-ism Redux

It was my hope for some time, after having been critical of Rick Warren after the Purpose Driven Life and number of other public statements, that maybe he was making a turn from his doctrinal chameleon-ism and becoming more publically convicted of core protestant doctrinal distinctives. I based that on John Piper’s interview.

But maybe he is becoming convicted in another sense. In the ecumenical sense.

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Zimzum of Whuh? Quote from Bell Sounds Too Familiar

http://www.religionnews.com/2014/12/02/what-ever-happened-rob-bell-pastor-questioned-gates-hell/

Rob Bell, speaking of his newfound “church” expression sounds way too familiar, as in it sounds like much of the language of the younger evangelical ecclesiological experiments of the present.

“Now resettled near Los Angeles, the couple no longer belongs to a traditional church. ‘We have a little tribe of friends,’ Bell said. ‘We have a group that we are journeying with. There’s no building. We’re churching all the time. It’s more of a verb for us.'”

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Antinomianism Ironically Produces Legalism

The antinomian, in an attempt to overthrow the law of God for lawlessness, finds himself, of necessity, creating his own basis for morality. The void will not go unfilled. The end result is legalism, that is, the establishment of his own laws that he attempts to enforce on others. The ironic thing about lawlessness is that it actually produces the worst kind of law: legalism. Whereas antinomianism and legalism are normally pitted against each other as two ditches on either side of the road (which in fact they are in many respects), the deeper reality is that they are extremely complimentary and inextricably tied together, one giving rise to the other. Antinomianism ironically produces legalism and many times the worst forms.

AT&T Gigapower in West Fort Worth, TX

After events that occurred with AT&T on the technical and customer service sides back when I first moved into my new house, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect with changing over, once again, to new service. However, after all of the frustration and mind-boggling breakdowns in order processing and account bungling from a few months ago, this has been worth the wait.

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The Error of Full on Ayn Randian Libertarianism on Display

Donald Trump and Ann Coulter’s stunning comments clearly display what is wrong with a purely Ayn Randian libertarian worldview and philosophy, wrapped in a veneer of Christian language (in Coulter’s case). It’s simply the flip side of the coin of Marxism. One side of the coin believes in the all-powerful State and collectivism as the sufficient means for human flourishing, while the other believes in the all-powerful individual to “pull up his bootstraps,” a radical individualism at the expense of those most in need, physically and spiritually.

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Being Thankful in the Ordinary

Is The Christian Life More Like Colorado Or Nebraska? – R. Scott Clark

R. Scott Clark at The Heidelblog has written a great piece on appreciating and even expecting the ordinary in the Christian life. So much of evangelicalism has pushed the idea, intentionally or not, that the Christian life is one of extraordinary emotional experience and that if you’re not experiencing that “high” or mountain-top event on a frequent basis, well, something is amiss in your walk (which is a form of legalism). The result is misplaced guilt that you aren’t doing enough to warrant obtaining that experience others seem to have. The reality though is that so much of the Christian life simply comes down to contentment, thankfulness and settled-ness as to where God has us and looking for the opportunities to be a light in that place. Here are a few quotes from his article: Continue reading

Why Traditional Ecclesiastical Structures Matter

http://mikeyanderson.com/hello-name-mike-im-recovering-true-believer

http://chantrynotes.wordpress.com/2014/06/26/new-calvinism-and-celebrity Continue reading



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