David Westerfield

Theology, Culture, Technology, Reviews, and Other Commentary



A Theological Journey to Presbyterianism

Grace Presbyterian Church, 1983As a teenager growing up in east Fort Worth, in the summer of 1995, I can remember it well. Stuck in the doldrums of my own sin, like a washing machine on spin cycle, I was miserable. With the likes of Nine Inch Nails, Skinny Puppy, Ministry, My Life With the Thrill Kill Cult, and other dark industrial bands blaring in the background of my room, in anger I tried to ignore and suppress the Lord calling me… Until one day this guy showed up to my house, in my room, and brought a presence with him that I couldn’t explain. We chatted some (and I found out later that he was absolutely terrified being in my room, because of the strong demonic presence; read my bio), then he looked at my CD collection and said very directly, “You need to get rid of all these and throw them away.” Now normally, anyone else could have told me this and I would have cynically blown it off as some religiousy call to “clean my act up.” Not that day.

Continue reading

Hadoop Big Data Twitter Sentiment Analysis

This is fascinating to watch:

The Protestant Deformation and American Foreign Policy – An Essay by James Kurth

The following is an essay from 2001 by political scientist James Kurth on the “Protestant Deformation” or what could be described as the radical secularization of Protestantism. As he notes, we’re now entering the final stages of this deformation, a long and twisty road that has led us to a radical individualism that threatens a new form of totalitarianism upon the free world: the totalitarianism of the self. Enjoy.

http://web.archive.org/web/20120119184608/http://phillysoc.org/Kurth%20Speech.htm
H/T http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/the-protestant-deformation/

Analysts of American foreign policy have debated for decades about the relative influence of different factors in the shaping of American foreign policy. National interests, domestic politics, economic interests, and liberal ideology have each been seen as the major explanation for the peculiarities of the American conduct of foreign affairs. But although numerous scholars have advocated the importance of realism, idealism, capitalism, or liberalism, almost no one has thought that Protestantism – the dominant religion in the United States – is worth consideration. Certainly for the twentieth century, it seemed abundantly clear that one could (and should) write the history of American foreign policy with no reference to Protestantism whatsoever.

This essay will present an alternative view. We will argue that American foreign policy has been, and continues to be, shaped by the Protestant origins of the United States. But the Protestantism that has shaped American foreign policy over two centuries has not been the original religion but a series of successive departures from it down the scale of what might be called the Protestant declension. We are now at the end point of this declension, and the Protestantism that shapes American foreign policy today is a peculiar heresy of the original religion, not the Protestant Reformation but what might be called the Protestant Deformation. With the United States left as the sole superpower, this Protestant Deformation is at its greatest, even global influence. But because it is such a peculiar religion, and indeed is correctly seen as a fundamental and fatal threat by all the other religions, its pervasive sway is generating intense resistance and international conflict.  Continue reading

Katie Westerfield (May 30, 1928 – May 22, 2015)

katieKatie Lou Gardner Westerfield passed away at the age of 86 in Ridgeland on May 22, 2015. A lifelong resident of Mississippi, she was born in Neshoba on May 30, 1928 to James Alton and Nannie Pearl Gardner. She grew up in Philadelphia with sisters Fannie Bee and Lyda.

Visitation will be from 3-5pm on Sunday at Ott and Lee Funeral Home in Richland. The service will be 10am Monday, May 25, 2015 in the chapel of the funeral home and interment will be at Lakewood Memorial Park on Clinton Blvd.

After graduating as valedictorian from Philadelphia High School, she moved to Jackson and began a secretarial career. Katie placed her working career on hold after the births of her children. She retired in 1991 from the Mississippi Department of Education, Vocation and Technical Division, where she worked as Secretary for the State Supervisor of Health Occupations Education and the Assistant State Director of Programs Operations Services. She continued her education while working and obtained a Bachelor’s in General Studies from Mississippi College.

Continue reading

Converting A Claims-Based Web Application to Classic (Windows) Authentication

To test out the migration of a site from SharePoint 2010 to 2013, I needed to convert a test environment web application to claims authentication to prepare for the move. However, to prove out my methodology and make sure I had the process down, I converted the web app back to classic authentication in order to repeat my steps. I’ve found a number of sites that explain how to do this, but have yet to find it all consolidated into one post. So here’s what I’ve found. Continue reading

Why Christ Was Crucified – John Calvin, Institutes II.XVI.VI

http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/institutes.iv.xvii.html

rp_calvin1.jpgThe very form of the death embodies a striking truth. The cross was cursed not only in the opinion of men, but by the enactment of the Divine Law. Hence Christ, while suspended on it, subjects himself to the curse. And thus it behoved to be done, in order that the whole curse, which on account of our iniquities awaited us, or rather lay upon us, might be taken from us by being transferred to him. This was also shadowed in the Law, since the word by which sin itself is properly designated, was applied to the sacrifices and expiations offered for sin. By this application of the term, the Spirit intended to intimate, that they were a kind of kaqarmavton (purifications), bearing, by substitutions the curse due to sin. But that which was represented figuratively in the Mosaic sacrifices is exhibited in Christ the archetype. Wherefore, in order to accomplish a full expiation, he made his soul a propitiatory victim for sin (as the prophet says, Is. 53:5, 10), on which the guilt and penalty being in a manner laid, ceases to be imputed to us. The Apostle declares this more plainly when he says, that “he made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him,” (2 Cor. 5:21). For the Son of God, though spotlessly pure, took upon him the disgrace and ignominy of our iniquities, and in return clothed us with his purity. To the same thing he seems to refer, when he says, that he “condemned sin in the flesh,” (Rom. 8:3), the Father having destroyed the power of sin when it was transferred to the flesh of Christ. This term, therefore, indicates that Christ, in his death, was offered to the Father as a propitiatory victim; that, expiation being made by his sacrifice, we might cease to tremble at the divine wrath. It is now clear what the prophet means when he says, that “the Lord has laid upon him the iniquity of us all,” (Is. 53:6); namely, that as he was to wash away the pollution of sins, they were transferred to him by imputation. Of this the cross to which he was nailed was a symbol, as the Apostle declares, “Christ has redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth 440on a tree: that the blessing of Abraham might come on the Gentiles through Jesus Christ,” (Gal. 3:13, 14). In the same way Peter says, that he “bare our sins in his own body on the tree,” (1 Peter 2:24), inasmuch as from the very symbol of the curse, we perceive more clearly that the burden with which we were oppressed was laid upon him. Nor are we to understand that by the curse which he endured he was himself overwhelmed, but rather that by enduring it he repressed broke, annihilated all its force. Accordingly, faith apprehends acquittal in the condemnation of Christ, and blessing in his curse. Hence it is not without cause that Paul magnificently celebrates the triumph which Christ obtained upon the cross, as if the cross, the symbol of ignominy, had been converted into a triumphal chariot. For he says, that he blotted out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross: that “having spoiled principalities and powers he made a show of them openly, triumphing over them in it,” (Col. 2:14, 15). Nor is this to be wondered at; for, as another Apostle declares, Christ, “through the eternal Spirit, offered himself without spot to God,” (Heb. 9:14), and hence that transformation of the cross which were otherwise against its nature. But that these things may take deep root and have their seat in our inmost hearts, we must never lose sight of sacrifice and ablution. For, were not Christ a victim, we could have no sure conviction of his being ajpoluvtrwsi”, ajntivlutron, kai; iJlasthvrion, our substitute-ransom and propitiation. And hence mention is always made of blood whenever scripture explains the mode of redemption: although the shedding of Christ’s blood was available not only for propitiation, but also acted as a laver to purge our defilements.

Resources for this Good Friday

AT&T to Upgrade Gigapower Internet in West Fort Worth – 300 Mbps

In keeping their word, AT&T is making up for some foul-ups last year on my account when we moved. They are now announcing the roll out of 300 mbps internet in west Fort Worth via their Gigapower internet service. Excited to see the results!

CA5U_0AWUAAY0Wn

Converting a SharePoint Web Application to Claims Authentication from Classic Auth

If you’re ever in need of converting your existing web applications within SharePoint to claims authentication from classic auth, you’ll need to run the following commands.

In order to do this, you’ll need to use the SharePoint PowerShell command prompt and run the commands in the order below under your farm service account: Continue reading

Granting A Service Account Access to a Web Application in SharePoint 2013

Need to give a service account access to a web application in SharePoint 2013? Easy! Just run these two PowerShell commands as the farm service account in the SharePoint PowerShell command prompt:

$webApp = Get-SPWebApplication http://contoso.com
$webApp.GrantAccessToProcessIdentity("CONTOSO\svcacct-contoso")

Done.



« Older posts

© 2015 David Westerfield

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑