David Westerfield

Theology, Culture, Technology, Reviews, and Other Commentary



Why Christ Was Crucified – John Calvin, Institutes II.XVI.VI

http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/institutes.iv.xvii.html

rp_calvin1.jpgThe very form of the death embodies a striking truth. The cross was cursed not only in the opinion of men, but by the enactment of the Divine Law. Hence Christ, while suspended on it, subjects himself to the curse. And thus it behoved to be done, in order that the whole curse, which on account of our iniquities awaited us, or rather lay upon us, might be taken from us by being transferred to him. This was also shadowed in the Law, since the word by which sin itself is properly designated, was applied to the sacrifices and expiations offered for sin. By this application of the term, the Spirit intended to intimate, that they were a kind of kaqarmavton (purifications), bearing, by substitutions the curse due to sin. But that which was represented figuratively in the Mosaic sacrifices is exhibited in Christ the archetype. Wherefore, in order to accomplish a full expiation, he made his soul a propitiatory victim for sin (as the prophet says, Is. 53:5, 10), on which the guilt and penalty being in a manner laid, ceases to be imputed to us. The Apostle declares this more plainly when he says, that “he made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him,” (2 Cor. 5:21). For the Son of God, though spotlessly pure, took upon him the disgrace and ignominy of our iniquities, and in return clothed us with his purity. To the same thing he seems to refer, when he says, that he “condemned sin in the flesh,” (Rom. 8:3), the Father having destroyed the power of sin when it was transferred to the flesh of Christ. This term, therefore, indicates that Christ, in his death, was offered to the Father as a propitiatory victim; that, expiation being made by his sacrifice, we might cease to tremble at the divine wrath. It is now clear what the prophet means when he says, that “the Lord has laid upon him the iniquity of us all,” (Is. 53:6); namely, that as he was to wash away the pollution of sins, they were transferred to him by imputation. Of this the cross to which he was nailed was a symbol, as the Apostle declares, “Christ has redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth 440on a tree: that the blessing of Abraham might come on the Gentiles through Jesus Christ,” (Gal. 3:13, 14). In the same way Peter says, that he “bare our sins in his own body on the tree,” (1 Peter 2:24), inasmuch as from the very symbol of the curse, we perceive more clearly that the burden with which we were oppressed was laid upon him. Nor are we to understand that by the curse which he endured he was himself overwhelmed, but rather that by enduring it he repressed broke, annihilated all its force. Accordingly, faith apprehends acquittal in the condemnation of Christ, and blessing in his curse. Hence it is not without cause that Paul magnificently celebrates the triumph which Christ obtained upon the cross, as if the cross, the symbol of ignominy, had been converted into a triumphal chariot. For he says, that he blotted out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross: that “having spoiled principalities and powers he made a show of them openly, triumphing over them in it,” (Col. 2:14, 15). Nor is this to be wondered at; for, as another Apostle declares, Christ, “through the eternal Spirit, offered himself without spot to God,” (Heb. 9:14), and hence that transformation of the cross which were otherwise against its nature. But that these things may take deep root and have their seat in our inmost hearts, we must never lose sight of sacrifice and ablution. For, were not Christ a victim, we could have no sure conviction of his being ajpoluvtrwsi”, ajntivlutron, kai; iJlasthvrion, our substitute-ransom and propitiation. And hence mention is always made of blood whenever scripture explains the mode of redemption: although the shedding of Christ’s blood was available not only for propitiation, but also acted as a laver to purge our defilements.

Resources for this Good Friday

AT&T Fixing to Upgrade Gigapower Internet in West Fort Worth – 300 Mbps

In keeping their word, AT&T is making up for some foul-ups last year on my account when we moved. They are now announcing the roll out of 300 mbps internet in west Fort Worth via their Gigapower internet service. Excited to see the results!

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Converting a SharePoint Web Application to Claims Authentication from Classic Auth

If you’re ever in need of converting your existing web applications within SharePoint to claims authentication from classic auth, you’ll need to run the following commands.

In order to do this, you’ll need to use the SharePoint PowerShell command prompt and run the commands in the order below under your farm service account: Continue reading

Granting A Service Account Access to a Web Application in SharePoint 2013

Need to give a service account access to a web application in SharePoint 2013? Easy! Just run these two PowerShell commands as the farm service account in the SharePoint PowerShell command prompt:

$webApp = Get-SPWebApplication http://contoso.com
$webApp.GrantAccessToProcessIdentity("CONTOSO\svcacct-contoso")

Done.

SharePoint 2013 – Adding Additional AD Domains for People Picker

In SharePoint 2010, if you had other domains that you needed to lookup users on in order to give them access to a site, it just worked without having to do any further configuration.

Not so with SharePoint 2013. You must add each domain and sub-domain to each web application to be able to perform user lookups from within the people picker.

So how do you do this? Well, with PowerShell, and fortunately Microsoft has provided a nice script that performs it for you. Otherwise, it would be quite a task.

It’s important to note that you must add the default domain your SharePoint environment is currently setup in. Otherwise, you won’t even be able to do lookups in it! (Found that out the hard way)

Instructions: Open Notepad or your favorite text editor, copy and paste the code below into the file, and save it as a .ps1 file. Open the SharePoint PowerShell command window as an Administrator, and an account with farm level access, change the directory (cd C:\YourDirectory, etc.) to the place you saved the code below (as a .ps1 file), type out .\YourPowerShellScript.ps1 and hit enter.

*I provide this as is, with no guarantees it will resolve your issues. And if you muck up your environment, it’s not my fault. :) Obviously you should perform this on a dev or test environment first before attempting it in production. Good luck!* Continue reading

Prayer for Peace – Spurgeon

And seek the peace of the city whither I have caused you to be carried away captives, and pay unto the Lord for it: for in the peace thereof shall ye have peace. (Jeremiah 29:7)

The principle involved in this text would suggest to all of us who are the Lord’s strangers and foreigners that we should be desirous to promote the peace and prosperity of the people among whom we dwell. Specially should our nation and our city be blest by our constant intercession. An earnest prayer for your country and other countries is well becoming in the mouth of every believer. Eagerly let us pray for the great boon of peace, both at home and abroad. If strife should cause bloodshed in out streets, or if foreign battle should slay our brave soldiers, we should all bewail the calamity; let us therefore pray for peace and diligently promote those principles by which the classes at home and the races abroad may be bound together in bonds of amity.

David Phillips Final Sermon He Never Got to Deliver on Anxiety and Suffering

Originally posted at blog.myspace.com on Friday, February 17, 2006, archived here http://old.westerfunk.net/archives/personal/Dave%20Sermon%20Notes/

I. INTRODUCTION

A. Read Philippians 4:4-7

B. ILLUS. Chaplaincy. Summer 2002. I was assigned to the reception station at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. I was counseling teenagers just about to step into Basic Training. The ones who stopped by my office were stressed and anxious about girlfriends they left behind, mean drill sergeants, the radical culture change, etc. and I did my best to soothe their worries and give them hope. One afternoon, halfway through my assignment, the Deputy Assistant Installation Chaplain and my Brigade Chaplain (my boss) entered my office. They told me that the Red Cross just informed them that my dad had had a massive coronary and was being care-flighted to a hospital 100 miles away and that my mom was in a car trailing them. I was to be released immediately to fly home and take care of family business. The counselor had now become the counselee. Continue reading

Dallas Snowstorm, 1956

My Aunt Christina recently posted a couple of pictures of her and my mom in 1956 during one of their big snowstorms in Dallas. Always fun seeing new pictures from their past. Continue reading

Migrating a Host-Named Site Collection (HNSC) From One Farm to Another

Since I had to piece together how to accomplish the migration of a host-named site collection I had already setup in SharePoint 2013, from one farm to another, I figured I would outline exactly how to do it. In my case, I needed the HNSC to be in its own content database, I’m targeting a particular web app with the HNSC as opposed to using a wildcard web app to handle the hostnames, and all of this is assuming you have your rights setup to be able to carry out all of this; SQL, SharePoint farm account and otherwise. With that said… Continue reading



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