David Westerfield

Theology, Culture, Technology, Reviews, and Other Commentary

Category: History (page 1 of 2)

Maafa 21 – The Abhorrent Beginnings of and Reasons for Planned Parenthood

What is so awful about Planned Parenthood? Well the fact that they kill children in the womb. “But it’s just 3%,” some say. Well, it’s 3% too many. But behind these necessary questions is the equally important question: why and how did Planned Parenthood come into existence? What is the history of the organization? Maafa 21 has the answer. It’s unbelievable. The reason it came into existence is just as abhorrent and saddening as the statistics of children murdered in the womb, merely by this organization. This should be watched by every person in America. (WARNING: there are some very tough things to hear, “mature” subject matter and offensive quotes in this documentary from founders and supporters of Planned Parenthood and others who supported the Eugenics movement.)

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Matt Drudge at the National Press Club in 1998

Matt Drudge makes great points on journalism in this speech he gave to the National Press Club in DC on June 2, 1998. Just think of what the main-stream media has become the 12 years that has passed since this was recorded: a pure marketing outlet for governments and corporations to spin things however which way they deem necessary to suit their agenda. And it’s no wonder the new media, the very thing he envisioned in this speech, is taking off. And it’s no wonder the Federal government (FTC/FCC) wants to squelch it. All his points still apply, and then some.

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C.S. Lewis’s Introduction to Athanasius’s On the Incarnation

Excerpted from On the Incarnation by Athanasius on Spurgeon.org

There is a strange idea abroad that in every subject the ancient books should be read only by the professionals, and that the amateur should content himself with the modern books. Thus I have found as a tutor in English Literature that if the average student wants to find out something about Platonism, the very last thing he thinks of doing is to take a translation of Plato off the library shelf and read the Symposium. He would rather read some dreary modern book ten times as long, all about “isms” and influences and only once in twelve pages telling him what Plato actually said. The error is rather an amiable one, for it springs from humility. The student is half afraid to meet one of the great philosophers face to face. He feels himself inadequate and thinks he will not understand him. But if he only knew, the great man, just because of his greatness, is much more intelligible than his modern commentator. The simplest student will be able to understand, if not all, yet a very great deal of what Plato said; but hardly anyone can understand some modern books on Platonism. It has always therefore been one of my main endeavours as a teacher to persuade the young that firsthand knowledge is not only more worth acquiring than secondhand knowledge, but is usually much easier and more delightful to acquire.

This mistaken preference for the modern books and this shyness of the old ones is nowhere more rampant than in theology. Wherever you find a little study circle of Christian laity you can be almost certain that they are studying not St. Luke or St. Paul or St. Augustine or Thomas Aquinas or Hooker or Butler, but M. Berdyaev or M. Maritain or M. Niebuhr or Miss Sayers or even myself.

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The Liberal Trajectory Toward an Adjusted Gospel

Excerpt from Albert Mohler’s talk at T4G, entitled, How Does it Happen? Trajectories Toward an Adjusted Gospel (Audio) (Video)

“You might want to notice that in the most recent issue of Christianity Today, the April issue that arrived to me just days ago, in the cover story, Scot McKnight says, ‘I can count on one hand the number of historical Jesus scholars who hold orthodox beliefs.’ A fascinating statement. But the moment you begin to entertain the notion that there’s a distinction between the Jesus of history and the Christ of faith, you have already bankrupted the faith.

“Adolph von Harnack, another one of the most important figures in modern liberal theology, made an argument that I have actually heard some evangelicals paraphrase without understanding the toxic source and the disastrous meaning. Harnack said Christianity is like a seed or a kernel that is surrounded by a husk, kind of like a coconut. And he said that the kernel is authentic meaning, but the husk is this … he called it the acute Hellenization of doctrine, it’s this elaborated doctrine, it’s creeds and confessions and propositional statements and Scriptural claims concerning Jesus Christ, Gospel, salvation, fall, eschatology. Long before Bultmann, Harnack said what we must do to rescue Christianity is to pay attention to salvaging the seed and let the husk go. Do you buy into that? You’ve already given it all away.”

Historical Examples of False Flag Attacks as Pretexts For War – Wikipedia

False flag attacks are not something that get discussed much when talking about the history of wars and conflicts. However, they have been used by governments for years to justify attacks on other countries, as well as create public support for whatever the authorities deem necessary to deal with the alleged/created threat.

Just what is a false flag attack? Here is an explanation on Wikipedia: “covert operations which are designed to deceive the public in such a way that the operations appear as though they are being carried out by other entities. The name is derived from the military concept of flying false colors; that is, flying the flag of a country other than one’s own.”

Here are just a few examples, including a couple involving the US. Many historians have even come to the conclusion that the Gulf of Tonkin Incident was a false flag attack orchestrated by the US, using old, empty destroyers as the targets, as a justification for the war in Vietnam. To my knowledge, this conclusion is unconfirmed, but being that the intelligence itself was skewed with documented proof of this fact, it seems at least possible these accusations could prove to be true.

The most interesting and quite startling false flag attack plan by the US that was thankfully never implemented was Operation Northwoods. When you read the information from that plan (PDF), you won’t believe your eyes.
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Little Known Piece of History From the 1930′s

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Behind the Wall: “On Reading My Stasi Files”

On reading my Stasi files – FindArticles.com

Since the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin wall on November 9th, I’ve had a fascination in reading up on the history of the events and circumstances leading up to the Wall’s demise. In searching through some information, I came across this article in which a student doing his doctoral dissertation went over to East Germany to gather information. It proved to be a frightening experience as he recalls the story of being incarcerated multiple times, for hours at a time, for no apparent reason. Very interesting. Here’s an excerpt:

From my files it appears that the Stasi used three tactics with me. First, my interrogation officer repeatedly told me that I would remain in Investigation Prison until I confessed, and that I would be unable to contact the American Embassy, my lawyer, or my family. Such isolation, of course, was stressful. One reads that many made false confessions simply to come to trial and thence to a regular prison so that they could begin to have contact with their families again. Those who did not confess often stayed in Investigation Prison for periods longer than a year and, when they finally came to trial, were given extra long sentences because they showed “no regret for their crimes.” Naturally, those who did confess were convicted, even if they repudiated their confession during their trial.

Christ’s Death and Human Redemption Through It

synoddordtThis is an excerpt taken from the Canons of of the Synod of Dordt pertaining to the sure salvation Christ has purchased on behalf of His people. Far from being dry old dusty doctrines, these statements are full of life, hope and great to meditate over to give us a deeper sense of what has been accomplished by Christ in the work of Calvary. Whenever we sing the song When I Survey the Wondrous Cross by Isaac Watts at church, well, this is what it means to survey it. We consider and stand in awe at what Christ endured on our behalf and how great His love is to do such a thing for wretched sinners. If you have not taken the time to ever read through this excellent statement affirming the great wonders of God’s grace and denying those ideas that attempt to subvert the Gospel’s greatness, I would highly suggest this.

Article 1: The Punishment Which God’s Justice Requires

God is not only supremely merciful, but also supremely just. His justice requires (as he has revealed himself in the Word) that the sins we have committed against his infinite majesty be punished with both temporal and eternal punishments, of soul as well as body. We cannot escape these punishments unless satisfaction is given to God’s justice.

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20th Anniversay of the Fall of the Berlin Wall

NewsNote: Moral Clarity and the Fall of the Wall – Albert Mohler

This day 20 years ago, November 9, 1989, was the day the Berlin Wall fell and Communist forces conceded their oppressive reign. I was ten years old and although I didn’t understand the full implications at the time, I can still remember watching the event unfold on the television and my parents being thrilled. My dad then explained to me the significance of that moment. And studying the history of how it got to that point later on, it became much clearer how truly significant that day was.

In order to commemorate 20 years of what represented the fall of a tyrannous, authoritarian, Communistic regime imposed upon a large portion of Europe and all of Russia, I wanted to post a few images and a musical work that captures the cultural deprivation and devastation resulting from so many years of oppression and repression.

The Berlin Wall being built in 1961:

Zero incentive:

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The Inseparable Relation of Doctrine to Christian Living

Peculiar Doctrines, Public Morals, and the Political Welfare – Excerpted introduction from a biography on the life of William Wilberforce by John Piper

“If you want to understand and appreciate The Life and Labor of William Wilberforce, one of the wisest things you can do is to read his own book, A Practical View of Christianity first, and then read biographies. The book was published in 1797 when Wilberforce was 37 years old and had been a member of the British Parliament already for 16 years. The book proved incredibly popular for the time. It went through five printings in six months and was translated into five foreign languages. The book makes crystal clear what drives Wilberforce as a person and a politician. And if you don’t see it first in his book, chances are you may not find it clearly in the biographies.

What made Wilberforce tick was a profound Biblical allegiance to what he called the “peculiar doctrines” of Christianity. These, he said, give rise, in turn, to true affections – what we might call “passion” or “emotions” – for spiritual things, which, in turn, break the power of pride and greed and fear, and then lead to transformed morals which, in turn, lead to the political welfare of the nation. He said, “If . . . a principle of true Religion [i.e., true Christianity] should . . . gain ground, there is no estimating the effects on public morals, and the consequent influence on our political welfare.” [1]

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